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Song Analysis “Save Me” Remy Zero

I feel my wings have broken in your hands
I feel the words unspoken inside and they pull you under
And I would give you anything you want but know you were all I wanted
And all my dreams are falling down
Crawling around and around

[For ten seasons, this song was the theme for the show “Smallville,” a primetime drama imagining Clark Kent as a teenager in the first decade of the new millennium and the choices he makes on the road to becoming Superman. I mention this fact because it’s essential to a proper understanding of the song. “Save Me” is about a hero feeling vulnerable because of his beloved.

The song begins with a line about broken wings. This conveys powerlessness or vulnerability. The series “Smallville” decided to rebuild Superman in a new way. One rule they decided early on was that Clark Kent would not wear a blue suit and a red cape. In essence, the creators of the series “broke Superman’s wings.” At the beginning of the series, Kent did not fly at all. As the series continued, he developed the ability to fly.

The speaker mentions words unspoken but felt. This is similar to the “elephant in the room” phenomenon. Two or more people are thinking about the issue and even though no one mentions it, both can tell from nonverbal cues that the other(s) are thinking about it too.

The speaker has to make a difficult choice – between his dreams and his beloved.]

Somebody save me
Let your warm hands break right through
Somebody save me
I don’t care how you do it
Just stay
Stay
Come on
I’ve been waiting for you

[The image here is of a person trapped under rubble or perhaps ice. The line, “Let you warm hands break right through,” is quite poignant. Has the speaker changed or not? Perhaps this stanza is from the beloved, asking for a savior. But perhaps it is the savior asking the beloved for help. I think one can see it either way.]

I see the world has folded in your heart
I feel the waves crash down inside and they pulled me under
I would give you anything you want but know you were all I wanted
And all my dreams have fallen down
Crawling around and around

[Is this cheesy? Okay, admittedly so. But this isn’t just lovey-dovey tripe, there is some artistic value here. The world folded inside the heart is breathtaking. And going back to Smallville, for Clark, Lana/Lois represents the entire human race. (Clark’s first love is Lana, but later he falls for Lois).  He is often aloof from people, even while saving their lives. Yet Lois reminds him of the innocence and spirit of humanity.

But what about these dreams that are falling down? There is a constant tension in the Superman epic between the ego and the superego. The ego just wants to have an ordinary American life. His dream is the American dream. Yet the superego keeps pushing him to strive to save lives, even as it destroys any kind of normalcy he tries to make for himself.)

Refrain
I’ve made this whole world shine for you
Just stay
Stay
Come on
I’m still waiting for you

Read more: http://artists.letssingit.com/remy-zero-lyrics-save-me-q1b8915#ixzz1QK1ykssG

Hey asad123 fans, I’m trying out a new feature to this blog. I am pasting links to my song analyses where you can hear the song I have just analyzed in its entirety for free.  Since this is something I am trying out, it’s only available for this post and my most popular post, “Song Analysis ‘Shape of My Heart’ Sting.”

Listen to \”Save Me\” Remy Zero

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Wine in the Poetry of Rumi

Everyone has an alcohol problem. Because of the nature of humans and the nature of alcohol, it is bound to be a problem. People love to indulge to excess and alcohol is destructive in excess. Societies that have developed cultures that reject alcohol likely have the smallest alcohol problem. Societies that drink in moderation have moderate alcohol problems. Societies with rampant binge drinking have the most significant alcohol problem.

You might argue that the failure of prohibition refutes my argument. In reality, it serves as an illustration of the argument. It is only when a society’s “culture” rejects alcohol that the society can progress beyond it. In prohibition, a minority political movement inspired the government to legislatively ban alcohol. Yet mainstream culture at the time still embraced alcohol as a necessary part of life so a binge society binged even more in the face of a statutory prohibition.

The Sufi poet Rumi used wine as a metaphor in his work. The intoxication of wine can represent the ecstasy of uniting with God. The fermentation of the grape reflects the development of the soul. Grape juice is cheap; good wine tends to be expensive. The unrefined soul has much less value than the soul refined by discipline and contemplation.

Rumi wrote:

“You only need smell the wine
For vision to flame from each void–
Such flames from wine’s aroma!
Imagine if you were the wine.”

http://www.poetry-chaikhana.com/R/RumiMevlanaJ/Youonlyneeds.htm

This makes me think of a “contact high.” A contact high occurs when a non-user of drugs feels light-headed or even intoxicated because of the smell or smoke of a drug. I believe Rumi  is talking about the ecstasy of union with the Divine. Just being near the people who have immersed themselves in God makes a person feel some of the intensity of that experience.

One of the Noble Companions of Prophet Muhammad (S), Hanzala (R), said that when he was in the company of the Prophet, he felt his faith soar. He disliked being away from him because he felt his faith plummet.

Read: http://www.poetry-chaikhana.com/R/RumiMevlanaJ/Nowcomesfina.htm.

Rumi waxes eloquently about the glory of God. He says the prince and the wise man are veils. Furthermore, the “wine of love” removes these veils. He invites people to drink with both eyes and “both heads.” These two heads may be the physical head of the body and the metaphysical head of the soul.

Does Rumi’s work glorify wine? It depends on whether you interpret him literally or figuratively.  He certainly describes wine, intoxication, and fermentation in glowing words and phrases. But if the wine is always a metaphor, he is not telling people to drink, but rather encouraging them to get closer to God.

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Painting Analysis – The Persistence of Memory – Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali was a Spanish surrealist painter. This is his immortal work, “La persistencia de la memoria” or “The Persistence of Memory.” He painted this work in 1931, at the age of 27. By 1920, Albert Einstein’s theory of special relativity gained widespread acceptance in the physics community. I will explain the connection between relativity and this painting later in the post.

There are several timepieces in this picture. We are used to clocks and watches being firm and solid. Clocks that melt, droop, and fold in on themselves contradict everyday experience.

Melting clocks may represent the collapse of pre-modern notions of time in the face of the Theory of Special Relativity. A thorough explanation of the Theory of Special Relativity would take more space than I am willing to devote on this blog. But part of the theory is that as a person’s velocity approaches the speed of light, time appears to slow down from the perspective of a stationary observer. The idea that time might depend on one’s frame of reference shocked the world, though now the theory has almost become boring as it is so commonplace.

There are ants crawling on a copper pocket-watch in the lower left-hand corner. These might represent death and decay. Of course, we are not used to watches decaying. Dali flips the normal expectation of time as eternal by depicting his clocks decaying.

In the middle of the painting rests a rounded gray figure looking somewhat like a dolphin. Some critics have pointed out that the figure resembles Dali’s face in profile. Others see features that look like long eyelashes which might symbolize female sexuality. If it is Dali himself, he might be musing on his own place in history, whether he will achieve lasting fame through his work or fade into obscurity. If the figure is feminine, Dali might be saying that sexuality changes with time.

On the left side of the picture, there are two rectangular platforms. They have hard, well-defined edges. In contrast, a cliff on the right side has rough, jagged edges. In between is a seascape. The sea and the cliff lend the painting a rigidity, a permanence that grounds the otherwise dreamlike imagery. In the upper left is a thin, barren tree. This tree adds to the sense of flexibility of time as one clock flops down from a branch like a pancake. Dali, as a surrealist, focused on dreams and hallucinations. This painting combines images that are unreal with images that are familiar much like a dream which juxtaposes the ordinary and the strange.

 

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Song Analysis “Rolling in the Deep” – Adele

There’s a fire starting in my heart

Reaching a fever pitch, it’s bringing me out the dark

Finally I can see you crystal clear

Go ahead and sell me out and I’ll lay your sh- bare

[Adele is PISSED. She compares her rising emotion to a fever. she is looking at the man she used to love, seeing his for once, under the light of reality. When she says she will lay his sh- bare, she meansshe will expose him for the jerk he is.]

See how I leave with every piece of you

Don’t underestimate the things that I will do

There’s a fire starting in my heart

Reaching a fever pitch

And its bring me out the dark

[She says that she will take away parts of him. Many people, on breaking up with a significant other, feel as if they are losing pieces of themselves. She talks about a fire in her heart, which naturally makes me think of heartburn. Heartburn feels awful. It feels like spilling acid on your chest. She hates the way she feels. She is angry and vengeful.]

The scars of your love remind me of us

They keep me thinking that we almost had it all

The scars of your love they leave me breathless

I can’t help feeling

We could have had it all

[“The scars of your love they leave me breathless” is like an entire love story carefully folded into a single verse. She feels so much pain now because she feels they had something special. She feels this man has damaged her forever. Think of a scar. Most scars are pretty small. But the scars of truly vicious abuse are different. They are so big and deep that even a seasoned doctor looking at them cannot help but gasp. That is the kind of scar the speaker has. Her scars might be emotional or they might be physical scars from domestic violence. She says they could have had it all, that is, everything they wanted. Isn’t it so amazing how the people who can make us sublimely happy can also bring us to our knees with pain?]

Rolling in the deep

You had my heart

Inside of your hand

And you played it

To the beat

[I really don’t know what to make of the phrase “rolling in the deep.” Still, it does create an image in my mind. I picture a scuba diver plunging into the ocean with waves swirling all around her. I think she wants to convey the depth of her emotion and the feelings in which she’s figuratively drowning. She describes her vulnerability, saying that he held her heart in his hands. The song abounds with metaphors and that makes it particularly fun to analyze.]

Baby I have no story to be told

But I’ve heard one of you

And I’m gonna make your head burn

Think of me in the depths of your despair

Making a home down there

It reminds you of the home we shared

The scars of your love remind me of us

They keep me thinking that we almost had it all

The scars of your love they leave me breathless

I can’t help feeling

We could have had it all

[The imagery here reminds me of classical depictions of Hell. His head is burning, he’s deep down in a miserable place, and he’s stuck there forever. The irony here is that this terrible home is like a Bizarro version of the home they had together. Perhaps the “depths of despair” is connected to “rolling in the deep.” Maybe it’s not her in the deep, but him, in her imagination. His rolling is like the twisted motions of a man writhing in pain.]

Rolling in the deep

You had my heart

Inside of your hand

And you played it

To the beat

Throw your soul through every open door

Count your blessings to find what you look for

Turned my sorrow into treasured gold

You pay me back in kind and reap just what you sow

Refrain

[She advises him on how to survive his miserable fate. She’s telling him to look for ways out. She’s reminding him to be thankful for what he still has. Finally, she says that he should expect all the bad he does to come back to him. She doesn’t really say this out of a wish to see him happy. It’s like she’s telling him the way the moral universe works just to remind him of how much he betrayed her.]

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Song Analysis – “Is It Any Wonder?” – Keane

I, I always thought that I knew,
I’d always have the right to,
be living in the kingdom of the good and true.

[The knowledge the speaker invokes means his belief that he had found love. The phrase “kingdom of the good and true” sounds oddly familiar but I can’t place where I heard it before. The kingdom probably represents paradise or some kind of utopia.]

And so on,
but now I think I was wrong.
And you were laughing along
and now I look a fool for thinking you were on my side.

[He realizes how foolish it was to think he had found love when his mate was really just playing with his heart. She was laughing behind his back.]
Is it any wonder that I’m tired?
Is it any wonder that I feel uptight?
Is it any wonder I don’t know what’s right?

[He asks rhetorically if it is at all surprising that he feels bad now. He feels exhausted, tense, and confused. All of these are quite normal for someone who has just had a relationship fall apart. “Tired” here might be physically tired, but is more likely reflective of emotional strain. When you deal with someone who is dishonest or difficult, isn’t it exhausting? The “uptight” here probably isn’t the “you-have-to-wear-a-tie” kind of uptight. It’s more like a person asking his girlfriend where she is going and who she is going with because his last girlfriend cheated on him.]
Sometimes,
It’s hard to know where I stand.
It’s hard to know where I am.
Well maybe it’s a puzzle I don’t understand.

[He is talking about feeling disoriented. Even though he uses words of physical location “where I am,” he means he feels disoriented in a social sense. It’s like a dog in a pack that doesn’t know if it’s an alpha or omega.]
Sometimes,
I get the feeling that I’m
stranded in the wrong time.
Where love is just a lyric in a children’s rhyme, a soundbite.

[A lot of fans particularly like this line “where love is just a lyrics in a children’s rhyme.” What the singer evokes here is a notion that love is a fairy tale, a myth. The part about being “stranded in the wrong time” suggests the possibility that sometime in the past, love may have been real, but now it’s not. Or perhaps he doesn’t want to time-travel back to another age, but simply to the moment when he still believed in the love he has now lost.]
Is it any wonder that I’m tired?
Is it any wonder that I feel uptight?
Is it any wonder I don’t know what’s right?

Oh these days,
after all the misery you made.
Is it any wonder that I feel afraid?
Is it any wonder that I feel betrayed?

[He lashes out at his ex. He explains that she made him feel miserable. He sees her now as a traitor. By using the phrase “is it any wonder,” he indicates that he is not getting upset about nothing, rather, any man in his position would feel the same way. It’s like him saying, “You slept with my best friend. Are you surprised that I’m upset?!?”]
Nothing left inside this old cathedral,
just the sad lonely spires.
How do you make it right?

[What is this cathedral doing here? Could it be a place that was special to him and his ex? Maybe she left him at the altar. Maybe he married her in the church and then they divorced. Perhaps his loss of faith in romance has affected his faith in God. Sometimes songs seem to be about a man and a woman but are really about God. Could this be such a song?

To evaluate that possibility, one has to review the entire song in a new light. Think about “the kingdom of the good and true” which might be the Heavenly Kingdom of God. Consider, “Now I look a fool for thinking you were on my side.” People often speak of having God on their side.  What about, “Is it any wonder I don’t know what’s right?” This line actually fits much better if the song is about God. When you break up with a significant other, you still know right from wrong. But when you lose faith in God, you might lose your moral compass.]

Oh but you try.
Is it any wonder that I’m tired?
Is it any wonder that I feel uptight?
Is it any wonder I don’t know what’s right?

Oh these days.
After all the misery you made,
is it any wonder that I feel afraid?
Is it any wonder that I feel betrayed?

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Make a Play: The Trailer for “Fordson”

Imagine an old Arab woman. A black veil obscures her wispy white hair. She has a fist in the air. She is chanting loudly. Zoom out and you notice with surprise that the woman is not praying, nor is she protesting. She is on the bleachers cheering at a high school football game. This is just one of the powerful images of a new documentary called “Fordson.” The film tells the story of Fordson High, a school in Dearborn, Michigan with a large population of Muslim students. The players on the football team endure not only the tremendous physical challenges of their sport, but the added challenges of fasting during Ramadan and the bigoted reaction to American Muslims on the anniversary of 9-11. Watch this trailer. Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and coworkers about it. It’s a story that cries out to be told.

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Bienvenue/Welcome

[Note to readers: WordPress tells me that people are translating my site into French. Today’s post is a special message in French. You can read it by going to translate.google.com. Select “translate web page” and put in the URL https://asad123.wordpress.com. I will likely write most future posts in English.]

Bienvenue à mes lecteurs français! Je voudrais envoyer un message spécial aux personnes qui lisent mon blog en français. S’il vous plaît excuser mes erreurs en français. Je n’ai pas étudié le français donc je me fie à Google Translate pour l’assistance.Gustave Flaubert a écrit, «L’artiste doit être dans son œuvre comme Dieu est dans la création, invisible et tout-puissant;. Il faut lui le sens partout, mais jamais le voir” Cette idée est quelque chose que je me sens profondément et quand je suis tombé sur le mot de Flaubert, Je me sentais comme s’il mettait en dire quelque chose qui était déjà dans mon cœur. Vous remarquerez que je n’écris pas beaucoup sur moi-même sur ce site. Ce n’est pas un accident. J’ai délibérément l’accent sur la musique, la religion et la politique plutôt que de raconter ma vie. Victor Hugo, que le fils brillant de la France, a écrit, “La musique exprime ce qui ne peut être mis en mots et ce qui ne peut rester silencieux.” Lorsque j’écris, je trouve défi et de fascination dans les idées qui sont difficiles à exprimer en mots. Peut-être que c’est une des raisons pourquoi j’aime écrire sur la musique. La musique est un médium qui peut utiliser des mots, mais qui peuvent aussi transcender la langue. Merci d’être venu et s’il vous plaît revenir.

 

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